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Sunday, September 11, 2011

'Ole Fuzzybutt Farts


‘Ole Fuzzybutt Farts

Luke & Hudson have found the newest member of their
pack. Hooray!

And, as you may have noticed the look of the blog is
changing a bit. We are covering more
content on responsible, positive pet care and ownership. We are asking some of the leading experts in animal training and behavioral medicine to offer advice and answer
questions. If you have a particular
topic you would like to see covered on the blog please leave a note in the
comment section or email the blog admin at
sheila@2dogs2000miles.org.

We will also be featuring personal stories from Great
Pyrenees owners in the future. If you’ve
followed Luke and the boys for long, you’ll recognize some of the writers and
their pyrs.

Many of our original puppies have found forever homes! We will continue to add puppies up to 6
months of age that are available for adoption through various rescues and
shelters, but the blog will also be adding what Luke affectionately calls our
“’Ole Fuzzybutt Farts”. These dogs will be pyr or pyr-mixes that are 6 years or older and located in rescues or shelters.

Senior dogs are often overlooked because they are no longer
fluffy teddy bears. But an older dog comes with a calmer demeanor, manners, training, often housebroken and their temperament can be more easily assessed than a pup. Plus, they are less likely to nimble on your furniture or expensive Italian shoes!

In the South, most senior pyrs that are in rescues or
shelters are owner surrenders. They were most likely “farm dogs” who have been replaced with the faster, newer pyr on the farm. Some owners in the area can no
longer afford the care of a large breed dog due to economic reasons. These are the senior dogs left in rescues or shelters.

So the older guys & gals sit and wait for a loving soul to see the potential in them as the adopters hurry past on the way to the puppy room.

Yes, owning an older large breed dog does have some challenges, and we’ll focus on those later but as with caring for a puppy; love, patience and commitment will gain you unconditional love from any age dog.






As with any medical
or behavioral issue or question regarding your pet’s care, we urge you to
contact your local vet for advice. This
blog is not intended to substitute for sound medical care.





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